Sewchet

Sewing, crochet, crafts, accessories, baking, tutorials,


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Crocheted and beaded necklace tutorial

In my last post I showed you the necklace that I made to go with the top I had just finished, to add a bit of colour to the neckline.

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It was quick and easy to do, so I decided to make a whole bunch more for the school to sell at their Summer fair – and here they are!

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The lovely folk on Instagram said that a tutorial would be nice, so here goes….

For each necklace you will need one skein of embroidery floss. I bought this packet of 30 for just £3.00 from The Works which, as most of the beads were rescued from broken jewellery, works out at only 10p each – perfect for the school fair, or any fundraising event.

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I chose beads ranging from natural wooden ones to lace covered pearlescent ones.

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For the necklace itself you will need a 2.5mm crochet hook.

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Simply crochet a chain to your desired length then fasten off.

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Tie the threads together in a double knot to complete the circle.

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Weave in the ends through a few chains and trim neatly.

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Using all the remaining floss, wrap it continuously around three fingers, leaving a tail of about 12″.

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Take a 5.50mm crochet hook….

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….and pass the handle through the loops as shown.

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Using the 12″ tail, wind the floss tightly, close to the crochet hook.

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Secure the floss with a knot.

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Cut through the bottom loops to form your tassel.

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Leave the crochet hook in place for now.

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Thread a needle with about 10″ of matching thread.

Take your beads and, starting at the bottom, pass the needle up through all the beads, around the crocheted chain and back down through all the beads.

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Push the beads up tight to the crocheted chain. Both ends of the floss should be hanging down from the bottom bead at this point.

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Pass your needle through the top loops that are still on your crochet hook.

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Tie the ends together securely.

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Hide the ends by passing the needle through the wrapped section and trim to the length of the tassel.

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And that’s it!

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These are some of the other ones I made.

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I think the girls at the school fair will have no problem parting with their pocket money for one of these.

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Patchwork Quilt Made From Old Tea Towels And Pillowcases

Every year the school holds a Summer fair to raise funds for the PTFA and I make various things for them to sell or raffle, often at the last minute, so I’m feeling a little bit smug that I’ve already started this year – and it’s not until June!

In three mammoth jam-making sessions I managed to make 42 jars of Blackberry and Apple jam, 25 of which are being donated for the school fair.

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Last year there was a ‘Horsington’s Got Talent’ stall, whereby parents and pupils make all manner of crafty things to sell, and for which I made lots of things. It was a huge success, selling out completely apparently, so the Committee have put out another request for handmade items.

As I inevitably end up spending quite a bit of money on things I make like sugar and lemons for the jam, all the ingredients for 50 scones and cakes for the cake stall, I try to make the crafty items out of things I can source for free or that I already have in my supplies.

Like this pile of (freshly laundered) pillowcases and tea towels, all surplus to requirements and acquired from several different people who know I can’t say no to gifts of leftover/unwanted fabrics.

I don’t know what you see when you look at this mix but, add in a bit of vintage lace trim and it screams “Patchwork quilt” to me. No? Well, that’s how my mind works, anyway:)

The very word ‘vintage’ conjures up images of faded florals and linens, so I picked out the remaining old Ikea pillowcases (some of which had been cut up to make hats for the jars of jam) and 3 or 4 neutral tea towels which would work nicely.

My Olfa quilting set made short work of cutting out the 48 6″ squares needed to make a quilt just large enough for a single bed.

I laid them all out on the floor and fiddled around until I was happy with the arrangement.

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All seams were stitched with 1/4″ seam allowance and pressed as each strip was completed.

This is the finished quilt top.

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For the backing, I had to piece together bits of wadding and leftover curtain lining to make up the size I needed.

With right sides facing, lay the lining on the quilt top, then the wadding on top again.

I stitched around all four sides, leaving a gap through which to turn the quilt. Then the lace trim was sewn to the edge.

Finally I added a little “Sewchet” label.

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I may go back and add a bit of hand quilting if I get time, but it actually doesn’t need it.

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It’s just the right size to be a comforter on a single bed, or would make a cosy lap blanket for the sofa.

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It took me six hours yesterday to make, so the fact that it will probably be sold for about a fiver has to be put to the back of my mind – but at least the fabric was free!